Some Mini-Demos on Key Watercolor Techniques

I did some video clips for a friend on foundational watercolor techniques and thought I might as well share them here.

The first clip is on these techniques:

  1. Achieving Color Variety–an exercise
  2. Mixing some Greens
  3. Painting it and leaving it alone to dry
  4. Softening edges.

Here is the Youtube link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tX2_orBrhv4&list=UUVAm6W43X6ERRzOxS6UlbLA&index=1&feature=plpp_video

The second clip is on created bushes and foliage with a brush and a sponge.  Here’s that clip’s link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96o6eOygfxo&list=UUVAm6W43X6ERRzOxS6UlbLA&index=1&feature=plpp_video

In the third clip I add shadows to the bushes and paint three skies using different techniques: (1) wet in wet; (2) dry brushed with softened edges; and (3) another wet in wet sky, this time two toned with storm clouds.  Here’s the link…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_5t9Eo7lQs&list=UUVAm6W43X6ERRzOxS6UlbLA&index=1&feature=plpp_video

Hope you enjoy them and return for more tips and techniques…

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5 Responses to Some Mini-Demos on Key Watercolor Techniques

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